Paul Glover

Spartan/Naxos

Paul Glover has been a regular face in film, television and on stage since the early 90s. He started his film career in cult horror film The Ugly. Other credits include The Fall Guys and The Locals. His role as a skinhead, Terry, in the film Snakeskin earned
him a finalist nomination in the NZ Film Awards, as did playing Danny in the film Fracture. Paul also starred as Detective Sergeant Paul Knox in award winning feature Out Of The Blue based on the true story of the Aramoana massacre. Years after playing Dylan Preston in Shortland Street, Paul now returns to South Pacific Pictures to work with an incurably funny and talented lot of actors in 800 Words. Not afraid of dirt or blood, Paul kept his clothes on, but got beaten up and covered in blood (a lot) as Salvius in the epic TV series Spartacus: Vengeance.

Stage highlights have included playing Dr Bruce Flaherty in Blue Orange, and working with Amanda Rees in the wonderful children's show The Owl And The Pussycat... as Owl. More recently Paul toured 2011-2013 in the acclaimed play Beautiful Losers. Last year he took a leap of faith when he was asked to play Richard and sing (debut) on stage with the formidably talented cast of the Kila Kokonut Krew created musical The Factory, a show which moved many audiences to ovation around Australia and at the Edinburgh Fringe in 2014.

Paul has also enjoyed working on various productions with Auckland Theatre Company over the years including Julius Caesar, In The Next Room (Or The Vibrator Play), Cat On A Hot Tin Roof, A Doll’s House and while performing in A Doll’s House, Paul joined a band of wayward stand up comedians for a night of revelry at the Monte Cristo room as part of Comedy Fest 2015. Paul is a proud member of MEAA since 2006.

In his spare time Paul has also managed to hold onto the most challenging role yet, in an unscripted improvisation called Life playing ‘Dad’.


"I’m excited to return again and join the diversely talented cast and production team
that brings you Lysistrata. Apoláfste to péos!"